book collections email follower instructable user
Picture of Home-made insect sticky traps!
20150614_151212.jpg

Welcome to spring! You've got a GREAT garden growing...and then the swarm of bugs shows up. Ugh.

Never fear, Instructables are here!

We LOVE our garden-fresh vegetables, but really dislike them being the buffet for all the bugs. We also don't like spraying poisons or toxins, so... what to do? Fight back with some high and low tech methods that REALLY work!

In this instructable, you will learn how quickly and easily you can make sturdy, waterproof insect traps that really work well, and do not break the bank! Ready to save your crop? Let's get started! : )

Step 1: Gather Materials /Tools

Picture of Gather Materials /Tools
STICKYCARD2.jpg
STICKYCARD3.jpg

There are basically 4 materials used in this low-tech version of my sticky traps:

MATERIALS

1. Old plastic vertical blind pieces, cut into 10-12" lengths

2. Fluorescent Yellow and/or Green spray paint.

3. Tanlgefoot ® Insect barrier tree resin.

4. 1/4" wooden dowel rods, tomato cage stakes or bamboo stakes.

TOOLS

1. Cheap, bristle 2" paint brush. (don't toss it - you can put in plastic bag for reuse next year!)

2. Disposable nitrile/latex or plastic gloves.

3. Cordless drill with appropriate sized drill bit for the stakes/dowel rod size you used.

snowf71 month ago
This is a great idea for taking care of the pests, but how do you protect the beneficial insects from getting caught on the strips?
JoeyyBoyy2 months ago
First, thank you for the simple and effective design project!
Bottom-line they work, lots of tiny insects get trapped and stay off my plants!

I made these but ran into an issue - the mixture combined with rain cause the yellow paint to run off/fade.
The surface remains sticky but the yellow paint bleeds out.

I decide to try first priming the blind slat, then paint, then coat with poly-coat.
Interesting, the color lasts longer but I still have the bleed out issue.

Side note: you can cut saplings from most shrubs to use as support stakes!

Another idea I have is to cover the traps with a tight fitting sandwich bag then apply the stick coat.
This would protect the trap from rain and possibly prevent paint run off!?

Thanks again for your instructable!
JoeyyBoyy made it!2 months ago
First, thank you for the simple and effective design project!
Bottom-line they work, lots of tiny insects get trapped and stay off my plants!

I made these but ran into an issue - the mixture combined with rain cause the yellow paint to run off/fade.
The surface remains sticky but the yellow paint bleeds out.

I decide to try first priming the blind slat, then paint, then coat with poly-coat.
Interesting, the color lasts longer but I still have the bleed out issue.

Side note: you can cut saplings from most shrubs to use as support stakes!

Another idea I have is to cover the traps with a tight fitting sandwich bag then apply the stick coat.
This would protect the trap from rain and possibly prevent paint run off!?

Thanks again for your instructable!

20190704_193243[1].jpg20190704_193223[1].jpg
kellievans12 months ago
GENIUS! I LOVE this! I grow Organic food in watering troughs and am ALWAYS on the hunt for non-chemical ways to get rid of the nasty critters. Good Job!
electriceyeguy (author) 3 months ago
Depending on how many plants you have, or level of insects you'll want to add quite a few of these in order to be effective. Place them low enough that the insects will easily see them and lure them in. The Flea beetles were especially bad that year, so we had to deploy a bunch of the traps. Our garden went on to thrive after we wiped out the bugs!
20150613_182101.jpg
AzureOzma3 months ago
I was just going to look for non-toxic bug killer, thank you!! Great first post!! Just voted for you.
electriceyeguy (author)  AzureOzma3 months ago
Thank-You! I hope everyone gets the message and puts the poison sprays DOWN for good. This is a good start, anyways.
CouchKushn3 months ago
This is great, I hope other cannabis growers see this. These work great for indoor growers that grow in a tent, as some times we get fungus gnats, aphids, spider mites, and other nasty critters that want to munch on our plants. Thanks for posting this great idea.
electriceyeguy (author)  CouchKushn3 months ago
It's posted on Rollitup.org under the DIY forum and yes, these catch all kinds of fungus gnats, whiteflies and aphids as well. You can easily protect outdoor plants from almost all crawling pests by using the same technique that is used to protect trees- just apply the TangleFoot on a strip of plastic or aluminum foil wrapped around the plants container. I have YET to see one crawling bug, slug or insect that can through this stuff. If only people would put the poisonous sprays and insecticides down and think outside the box...
pemazzei3 months ago
Very ingenious! But where to find the Tanlgefoot® Insect barrier? Please, what is the formula for the insect barrier? Is it possible to do at home? Thanks
electriceyeguy (author)  pemazzei3 months ago
Pemazzei- Here in the U.S. you can buy the Tanlgefoot® Insect barrier at ACE Hardware, Wal-Mart and Home Depot among others. Outside the U.S. check Amazon.com as it looks like they also carry it. Any other questions, let me know! Great question, thanks for reading my Instructable!
Thank you. I live in Brazil. I dont know if I can buy this kind of products by Air Mail. Maybe Amazon will refuse to sent it outside US. Several and several years ago, I heard of some tree resin. I will check with Mr. Google. Best regards
AnandM543 months ago
Wow .... nice idea !!
electriceyeguy (author) 3 months ago
I forgot to add this tip earlier: If you do not have some old vertical blind sections ( we save ours just for this purpose) check most blind stores or even Home Depot. Many of them have the in-store custom cut blind service, whereby they cut them to order. This leaves LOTS of discarded sections, some quite large. If one were to ask, they would probably let you have the cutoff pieces for free. If not, they also sell replacement sections for a nominal fee. I'm very frugal and like to re-purpose almost everything I can.
ScottR1653 months ago
How does this work for mosquitos?
electriceyeguy (author)  ScottR1653 months ago
Scott- I LIKE your thinking, but unfortunately mosquitoes are attracted by both heat signature and chemical attractant (CO2). That actually makes sense, biologically speaking. Mammals are warm blooded AND exhale CO2, ensuring the mosquito is attracted to the optimal target. The TangleFoot resin is awesome stuff, but highly doubt it would ever be considered as viable for mosquito reduction. P.S. Check out this video for a much better explanation: https://youtu.be/-PIoyFYEwPQ P.P.S. GREAT question!
electriceyeguy (author) 3 months ago
Thanks so much! I entered it in the Garden contest and it is showing up now. Hopefully lots of people will still see this and be able to use them in time to beat the bugs!
seamster3 months ago
Very nice solution, and a good instructable too. Well done! : )