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Picture of Using Arduino for Citizen Science!

Science allows us to ask our most pressing questions and explore all sorts of curiosities. With some thought, hard work, and patience, we can use our explorations to build a better understanding and appreciation of the complex and beautiful world around us.

This tutorial will teach you how to use an Arduino (uno) microcontroller, how to use different types of sensors, and how to gather and visualize data. Along the way, we'll build three projects: a tilt switch, a temperature and humidity sensor, and a light sensor!

Difficulty Level: Beginner

Read Time: 20 min

Build Time: Depends on your project! (Projects in this tutorial take about 15 - 20 min)

Step 1: Pssst, What's the Difference Between Citizen Science and "official Science"?

Picture of Pssst, What's the Difference Between Citizen Science and

The biggest difference is that citizen science is, as I love to say, "hand wavy", which means that there are lots of errors and uncertainties and no rigorous process to identify them. Because of this, conclusions reached through citizen science are much less accurate than science-science and should not be relied upon to make serious/life-altering/life-threatening claims or decisions.*

That being said, citizen science is a great way to build a fundamental understanding of all sorts of fascinating scientific phenomenon and is good enough for most day-to-day applications.

*If you are doing citizen science and you discover something potentially dangerous (e.g. high lead levels in water), inform your educator (if applicable) and contact the relevant authorities and professionals for assistance.